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FORKLIFT OPERATOR & AERIAL LIFT TRAINING

Tri-Lift Industries is committed to offering our customers a full range of OSHA training, Lift Truck training, Driver Training, and many others to meet your forklift certification and inspection needs.

Why Train With Tri-Lift?

Tri-Lift offers a complete and thorough forklift operator training conducted by an experienced and reliable source for Sit-Down, Stand-Up, and MEWP requirements. Properly trained forklift operators are more productive, reduce product and facility damage, and lower the overall cost of your material handling storage operation.

  • Training Conducted at Your Facility or Ours!
  • Forklift Operator Safety Training
  • Forklift Operator Recertification Training
  • Pedestrian Training
  • Operator Safety Training for Aerial Lifts, Scissor lifts and Boom lifts
  • Train the Trainer Programs
  • Equipment Pre-Shift Inspections and Documentation
  • Proper Battery Inspection, Watering and Charging Techniques
  • Propane Tank (LP) Inspection and Storage
  • OSHA TRAINING – Let us help you comply with OSHA Training Rule 29CFR1910.178
  • ANSI REGULATIONS – Let us help you comply with periodic and annual inspections for scissor lifts and boom lifts (MEWPS).

Training Courses

Forklift Operator Training: Sit-Down and Stand-Up

Tri-Lift provided Stand-Up and Sit-Down Operator Training is usually an 8 hour, hands-on training that can be conducted at a Tri-Lift branch or at a customer site (if the correct equipment is available, this is the customer’s responsibility to provide).

There are different types of training based on the equipment your company uses such as: Stand-Up, Sit-Down, and MEWPS (Mobile Elevated Work Platforms, this information is available in the next section). Determining the right class for your business is dependent upon your equipment. Each designation has separate training material and requirements for a operator to be certified to use. Here is a breakdown of the classes:

  • Stand-Up: If your forklift has your operator standing while operating the unit, this would be classified as a “Stand-Up” and would require that specialized training.
  • Sit-Down: If your forklift has your operator siting while operating the unit, this would be classified as a “Sit-Down” and would require that specialized training.

The 8 hour class we provide contains both written work and hands-on experience.

  • OSHA Forklift Regulations
  • Lift Truck Fundamentals
  • Principles of Balance, Stability and Capacity
  • Pre-Operational Inspections
  • Safety Guidelines for Operating Lift Trucks
  • Safe Load-Handling Techniques
  • Fueling: IC Trucks and Batteries
  • Proper Accident and Safety Hazards Documentation

The usual customers to attend our forklift operator training classes are obvious, those who routinely operate your forklifts. However, the list should extend beyond those people to include those that “might” operate a forklift for any reason at all, even if it means to move it out of the way so they can get to storage materials for example. 

Training others about forklifts benefits your employees even if they never operate one because it gives them a better understanding of the dangers and limitations of your forklifts as well as best practices for safety and efficiency. This creates a healthy respect for these vehicles and will result in better awareness in your facility, reduced accidents, costs, and improved productivity. Here are some examples outside of forklift operators that could use this training:

  • Truck Drivers
  • Maintenance Mechanics
  • Maintenance Managers
  • Warehouse Supervisors
  • Plant Managers
  • Distribution Managers
  • Anyone who may operate a lift truck
  • Anyone who works in an area routinely around forklifts

Not only is it critical to train your operators for safety reasons, there are financial, liability, and efficiency factors as well. OSHA and ANSI require that anyone who uses lifting equipment be certified and will require proof that training was conducted through an accredited source. 

If something happens to your employee and you cannot provide evidence that training was done through legitimate means, your company is on the hook for all fines, medical expenses (if applicable), and lost business time from a possible mandated business shut-down. From an efficiency standpoint, it is also beneficial that operators are able to use the equipment effectively for work. Lost time is lost revenue!

It is in everybody’s best interested the all operators are well trained for their safety and yours.

Following OSHA Regulation 29, CFR 1910.178 Powered Industrial Truck Operator Training, your operators are required to successfully complete both classroom and hands-on training.  Also included in our training programs are the following:

  • Workbooks – Yours to Keep and Reference!
  • Video presentations
  • Testing
  • Certification
  • Safety items (available for sale should you need)
  1. Compliance with regulatory requirements – OSHA and ANSI have requirements regarding forklifts and how they are used and maintained. Ultimately, it is the responsibility of every company to see that all users of forklifts are aware of the regulations and that the company is in compliance. Failure to comply not only opens your company up for potential fines, but also for fiscal damages should an injury occur within your fleet and operators out of compliance with government standards and regulations. 
  2. Increased useful life and lower operating costs – Training not only in safe, proper forklift operation, but also in proper pre-shift inspections, will result in catching small maintenance issues and fixing them before they blossom into repair headaches. Knowing proper methods of operating a forklift also results in less wear and tear on your equipment. All of this results in equipment that stays in better condition for a longer period of time, an increase in useful life of your forklifts, and lower operating costs. Proper training will also lower your costs in terms of less damage to the products your operators move, and to your facility. The bottom line is: thorough, documented, formalized training leads to better care for your equipment, your products, your facility and your bottom line.
  3. Better morale and improved “spirit” of safety – Employees that are professionally trained truly feel cared for, and they should! Each of your forklift operators is in control of a very dangerous piece of equipment. One wrong move could permanently change their lives or the lives of people working around the forklift. When they know you “have their back” and are not simply going through the motions to appease law requirements, they respond positively by projecting that spirit of safety into other facets of your operation and will “have your back” by letting you know of other possible improvements that could benefit your company.
  4. Improved productivity – Operators that receive ongoing training are more efficient at operating your forklifts. This efficiency translates into more productive employees. Improved morale and efficiency gained from training will increase how much work each of your operators can accomplish in a day, and that improves your bottom line.

If you have not been certified in 3 years or more  or you have been in a forklift related accident or infraction, you need to take a recertification course. We offer recertification courses for operators who have previously been certified, as well as full course for uncertified operators.

Tri-Lift only certifies users who work for a company already and have been signed up through that company. Tri-Lift does not certify individuals who are not affiliated already with a company.

MEWPs Training (Mobile Elevated Work Platform)

MEWP, or Mobile Elevated Work Platform, is training that is required by ANSI and OSHA on lifting equipment, including, but not limited to: Aerial Lifts, Scissor Lifts, and Boom Lifts. As with the Sit-Down and Stand-Up classes, MEWPs training is usually an 8 hour, hands-on training that can be conducted at a Tri-Lift branch or at a customer site (if the correct equipment is available, this is the customer’s responsibility to provide).

In June 2020, they made the name change from Aerial Work Platforms to Mobile Elevated Work Platform and with that name change came a new distinction for equipment. ANSI now breaks down MEWPs into 3 types:

  • Type 1 MEWPs can only travel with the platform in a stowed position.
  • Type 2 MEWPs can travel elevated and is controlled from the chassis.
  • Type 3 MEWPs can travel elevated and is controlled from the platform.

We go through all the safety guidelines and licensing requirements, similar to Sit-Down and Stand-Up training, within the 8 hour class we provide that contains both written work and hands-on experience.

  • ANSI MEWP Regulations
  • MEWP Type Truck Fundamentals
  • Principles of Balance, Stability with Operators
  • Pre-Operational Inspections
  • Safety Guidelines for Operating MEWP Trucks
  • Recommended/Required Accessories 
  • Proper Accident and Safety Hazards Documentation

The usual customers to attend our MEWP training classes are obvious, those who routinely operate your lifts. However, the list should extend beyond those people to include those that “might” operate a lift for any reason at all.

Training others about MEWP lifts benefits your employees even if they never operate one because it gives them a better understanding of the dangers and limitations of your lifts as well as best practices for safety and efficiency. This creates a healthy respect for these vehicles and will result in better awareness in your facility, reduced accidents, costs, and improved productivity. Here are some examples outside of lift operators that could use this training:

  • Truck Drivers
  • Maintenance Mechanics
  • Maintenance Managers
  • Warehouse Supervisors
  • Plant Managers
  • Distribution Managers
  • Anyone who may operate a lift truck
  • Anyone who works in an area routinely around forklifts

Not only is it critical to train your operators for safety reasons, there are financial, liability, and efficiency factors as well. OSHA and ANSI require that anyone who uses lifting equipment be certified and will require proof that training was conducted through an accredited source. 

If something happens to your employee and you cannot provide evidence that training was done through legitimate means, your company is on the hook for all fines, medical expenses (if applicable), and lost business time from a possible mandated business shut-down. From an efficiency standpoint, it is also beneficial that operators are able to use the equipment effectively for work. Lost time is lost revenue!

It is in everybody’s best interested the all operators are well trained for their safety and yours.

Here are some resources that are included in our training programs:

  • Workbooks – Yours to Keep and Reference!
  • Video presentations
  • Testing
  • Certification
  • Safety items (available for sale should you need)

If you have not been certified in 3 years or more or you have been in a forklift related accident or infraction, you need to take a recertification course. We offer recertification courses for operators who have previously been certified, as well as full course for uncertified operators.

Tri-Lift only certifies users who work for a company already and have been signed up through that company. Tri-Lift does not certify individuals who are not affiliated already with a company.

Train the Trainer

A forklift safety program can be implemented efficiently by utilizing the expertise of one of your own employees to train your employees. Train the Trainer program not only promotes your own company’s internal growth plan for employees, it also allows flexibility for training, cost savings, and a safety resource on-site when implementing new policies and procedures.

Trainer program members can become company trainers through education and materials provided by the company and Tri-Lift. These individuals should have knowledge of the forklift equipment being used by employees and experience working in the warehouse.

The Train the Trainer class is an 8 hour class that goes through all manners of equipment, safety, laws regarding, and more. It will also include hands on experience with equipment of all classifications.

Individuals acquainted with the forklift equipment that employees use and who have experience working on the floor or at the warehouse can be trained as company trainers through the use of education and training materials in the trainer program.

Traditionally, you want either a manager of operators or a safety representative to get certified but the class is designed for whoever wants to become your company’s internal champion of safety and efficiency!

Our Train the Trainer program comes with a Train the Trainer kit once certified. Here is what is included in that kit:

  • Instructor’s workbook
  • Testing materials 
  • 15 student workbooks
  • Train the Trainer Certification
  • Video materials
  • And more!

We will also have safety items (available for sale should you need) during and after the class.

Although there is no technical law that requires instructors to be recertified, it is in every company’s best interest to send their on-site Train the Trainer to redo the class every 3 years. Changes are made all the time between OSHA, ANSI, OEMs, etc. that need to be communicated and trained to Train the Trainers. If a new law is put in place and you haven’t been keeping up with these changes, your Train the Trainer is teaching outdated information that could be detrimental to you and your team.

Training
Never Ends

Since 1970, OSHA has worked to create a safer workplace for all employees, and their mission has been very successful. However, accidents still happen, and not only at companies willfully violating OSHA standards. Sometimes safety goes beyond meeting standards due to unique circumstances in certain operations.

Employees need to be involved in ongoing training – how to lift more safely, how to sit properly in a chair, how to operate a certain piece of equipment and so on. Your business is fluid: things change; equipment changes; and equipment, building space and employees are added. As your conditions change, your training must address these changes. Training for the safest work environments is never a one-time event or a two- or three-day training initiative. It is an ongoing pursuit of the safest possible work facility. It should be a goal of all employees to see that their co-workers go home safe every night.

Make It
A Mission

As managers and owners, we want a safe work environment for all of our employees. Unfortunately, all too often it escapes us. Time passes quickly, and initiatives that were once important standards become guidelines or even merely suggestions. How can we ensure that when we put safety measures in place, they will stay in place as employees come and go in a business climate that is constantly in flux?

Safety focused companies put as much emphasis on doing things safely as on doing them productively. From day one, every employee knows they are working for a company that would rather they do their job safely than quickly. These employees will lockout a piece of equipment when something goes wrong, will replace light bulbs that need it instead of ignoring them and will report unsafe behavior or unsafe conditions. Standard safety practices start and are enforced from the top down. It all starts with the company’s leadership!

Be Involved
& Accountable

While involvement in a safe work environment must start from the leadership level, it is also important to ensure that every employee knows that they are involved and responsible. It is a good idea to create safety teams for every facet of your business, to revolve people in and out of those teams, and to have them conduct frequent facility or department reviews to identify potential threats. The most successful companies have reward systems for reporting anything that could be a potential threat, even if it is as minor as a sharp corner on a coat rack. This keeps all employees engaged in creating a safe work environment.

Once you have established your safety mission and mapped out your strategy, everyone involved must be held accountable. No one can shirk their safety responsibilities. If a sharp corner on a coat rack is missed and someone gets cut, find out why no one noticed. Are they doing regular inspections? If safety standards are not being met, it is the leadership’s job to find out why and fix it. Everyone must know that if an accident happens on their watch, it must be accounted for and a plan must be designed to ensure that it will not happen again.

Warehouse Safety

Forklift Carbon Monoxide (CO) testing, Signs, Placards, Mirrors, Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE), Dock Safety Equipment, Lighting, Safety Harness and Lanyards, Safety Storage Cabinets, Spill Containment and more
CONTACT US

Equipment Safety

Periodic Inspection Programs, Pre-Shift Inspection Forms, Back-Up Alarms, Strobe Lights, Impact Sensors, Shock Switches, Speed Control Limiting Devices, and more available.
LEARN MORE

Fork Safety

Regular inspections ensure your forklifts and those working around them are safe from falling loads. TLI – Fork Inspection Log with instructions on inspection procedures.
INSPECTION LOG

Operator Safety

Our Operator Questionnaire helps walk you through the process of asking questions that will help you determine a plan of action for training your new or current operators.
QUESTIONNAIRE